Technology

BlackBerry secures connected cars

BlackBerry QNX

After enterprise and mobile security, BlackBerry is foraying into the world of connected cars in a bid to enable automakers create safe and secure connected vehicles.

BlackBerry’s new security platform for connected vehicles is called the “QNX Hypervisor 2.0”, which is based on QNX SDP 7.0. The SDP is BlackBerry’s secure 64-bit embedded operating system that enables developers to partition and isolate safety-critical environments from non-safety critical environments and minimize risk.

BlackBerry’s QNX Hypervisor 2.0 is capable of ensuring that hackers aren’t able to access critical systems of a connected vehicle through non-critical ECU system. BlackBerry`s “QNX Hypervisor 2.0” creates virtual software containers such that any hiccup or breach in a single car functional domain can be isolated and does not impact or create vulnerabilities in other domains of the car.

One example is the virtual cockpit, which uses a single System on a Chip (SoC) to run both an infotainment system and the car’s digital instrument cluster, which comprises the speedometer, odometer and gas tank indicator. The digital instrument cluster interfaces with critical driving systems, and thus needs to be both safety certified and architected in such a way that security is ironclad. With QNX Hypervisor 2.0, each of these two systems is isolated and kept safe, so that if the infotainment system were to crash, it would not take the safety-critical systems down with it.

The company also announced that Qualcomm Technologies has adopted “QNX Hypervisor 2.0” as part of certain digital cockpit solutions.

“The QNX Hypervisor 2.0 will assist automakers in taking greater advantage of the power of our Snapdragon automotive platform,” added Nakul Duggal, Vice President, Product Management, Automotive, Qualcomm Technologies, Inc.

Leave a Comment